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Music

Two very special house concerts with Robyn Hitchcock

19 and 20 September 2020

We will keep you updated as to whether these shows will be able to take place.

Supports:

19th: Lucy Kitchen

20th: Lucas and King

Tickets on sale 10 am on January 31.

Two unique and intimate shows with one of the world’s most distinctive singer-songwriters. Hampshire connections make this a must, as Robyn performs in a house concert setting for just 35 people. This is a private show with all income going to the artist. To secure a place for one of the shows, you can make your contribution by getting your ticket here.

Robyn Hitchcock is one of England’s most enduring contemporary singer/songwriters and live performers. A surrealist poet, talented guitarist, cult artist and musician’s musician, Hitchcock is among alternative rock’s father figures and is the closest thing the genre has to a Bob Dylan (not coincidentally his biggest musical inspiration).

Since founding the art-rock band The Soft Boys in 1976, Robyn has recorded more than 20 albums as well as starred in ‘Storefront Hitchcock’ an in concert film recorded in New York and directed by Jonathan Demme. 

Blending folk and psychedelia with a wry British nihilism, Robyn describes his songs as ‘paintings you can listen to’. His most recent album is self-titled and marks his 21st release as a solo artist. Out on April 21 2017, the album is produced by Brendan Benson (The Raconteurs). Hitchcock describes it as a “ecstatic work of negativity with nary a dreary groove.” 

It has received rave reviews from UNCUT, Rolling Stone, Paste, Tidal and more. 

“A gifted melodist, Hitchcock nests engaging lyrics in some of the most bracing, rainbow-hued pop this side of Revolver. He wrests inspiration not from ordinary life but from extraordinary imaginings…” – Rolling Stone

“These 10 gems slither, rock, roll, glide and shapeshift, coalescing around Hitchcock’s typically anxious, strained but striking and immediately identifiable vocals.” – American Songwriter

“Beloved of everyone from Led Zeppelin to REM, Hitchcock has only enhanced his status with this wonderful outing.” – Hot Press

“Witty, moving and seriously catchy, Robyn Hitchcock is a glorious return for a man who wasn’t really gone in the first place.” – Paste Magazine  

Robyn Hitchcock
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Music

Railway 40 – a Double Show with the Felice Brothers on June 20 – rescheduled

RESCHEDULED

These shows have been rescheduled for June 19, 2021. All tickets remain valid.

There will be two shows at the Railway Inn in Winchester: an afternoon show at 2pm and an evening one at 8pm. You can buy an afternoon or evening ticket for £20 or a double ticket for both shows for £35. The shows will not be identical. Tickets will go on sale on January 17 at 10 am.

Cut live to tape with very little overdubbing, the new Felice Brothers album Undress was recorded in the late summer of 2018 in Germantown, New York. Band members Ian Felice, James Felice, Will Lawrence (drums) and Jesske Hume (bass) teamed up with producer Jeremy Backofen to record their most personal and reflective album to date.

Undress follows the band’s 2016 album Life In The Dark, and finds the group in a very different place three years later. Between personnel changes, families growing and the political landscape, the result is a tighter, more-paired down release. “Every song is a story,” said James Felice. “On this album everything was a bit more thoughtful, including the arrangements, the sonic quality and the harmonies.”

“Many of the songs on the new album are motivated by a shift from private to public concerns,” says songwriter Ian Felice. “It isn’t hard to find worthwhile things to write about these days, there are a lot of storms blooming on the horizon and a lot of chaos that permeates our lives. The hard part is finding simple and direct ways to address them.”

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Music

Jeffrey Foucault at the Railway, April 1 – CANCELLED

We hope to be able to re-schedule this show in 2021.

In two decades on the road Jeffrey Foucault has become one of the most distinctive voices in American music, refining a sound instantly recognizable for its simplicity and emotional power. He’s built a brick-and-mortar international touring career of multiple studio albums, countless miles, and general critical acclaim, lauded for “Stark, literate songs that are as wide open as the landscape of his native Midwest” (The New Yorker), and described as “Quietly brilliant” (Irish Times).

In April 2020 Jeffrey Foucault will tour the United Kingdom in support of BLOOD BROTHERS (Blueblade Records, 2018) his sixth collection of original songs, with his longtime drummer and tour partner Billy Conway (Morphine) on drums. Ry Cavanaugh (Session Americana) opens the tour.

Since 2013 Foucault and Conway have toured relentlessly together, refining a primal, stripped-down stage show: two men, two chairs; a beat-up Gibson J-45 and an electric guitar tuned low and played through a 5-watt amp; a suitcase kick drum, a low-boy cymbal, a snare drum. The pair plays only what they can carry into the club alone in one trip, and cover all the territory from blues and country, to rock ‘n’ roll and folk, with a laconic ferocity and timeless cool. Their dynamic partnership – as nimble as it is sonically powerful – is the bedrock on which BLOOD BROTHERS builds its nuanced and poignant lament.

THE NEW YORK TIMES:?“Sometimes his songs run right up to the edge of the grandiose, and hold still, and that’s when he’s best… Close to perfection.”

UNCUT MAGAZINE (UK): “The music of Wisconsin native Foucault is the kind so many aspire to but never attain: beat-up troubadour folk whittled to dolorous perfection…”

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Music

Jerry Leger, April 26 at the Railway – CANCELLED

We hope to be able to re-schedule this show in 2021.

Jerry Leger has a thing for ghosts. The Toronto singer/songwriter confirmed it a couple of years ago when he went on a personal journey to explore many of Ontario’s largely unknown ghost towns, having been inspired by the writings of historian Ron Brown. Leger has immortalized one of those towns, Burchell Lake, on his new album Time Out For Tomorrow, containing 10 portraits of the impermanence of life, love, or simply catching a glimpse of a shooting star.

Yet, other ghosts reside much deeper in Leger’s songs. Whether they’re the voices of Roy Orbison, Lou Reed, Gene Clark, Rick Danko or Ronnie Lane, they naturally complement the universal truths at the core of Jerry Leger’s music, along with his undying faith in rock ‘n roll as a way for all people to find common ground.

Time Out For Tomorrow continues Leger’s run of consistently high output and displays the finely honed artistic vision that has been evident since 2005 when, at age 19, he released the first of nine studio albums, along with three more with his side projects The Del-Fi’s and The Bop-Fi’s. It’s added up to a body of work that was recently celebrated with the European-only compilation Too Broke To Die, aimed at Leger’s growing fan base in Britain and the EU.

Most of those listeners didn’t discover Leger until his 2014 album Early Riser, his first with Michael Timmins of Cowboy Junkies handling production duties, as well as the first to be released on the Junkies’ label, Latent Recordings. The combination of Timmins’ capture-the-moment production aesthetic and the Rolling Thunder-esque chemistry of Leger’s longtime band The Situation (plus a few special guests) now appears unbeatable. And although Time Out For Tomorrow may not be as expansive as Leger’s previous Timmins-produced effort, the acclaimed 2017 double album Nonsense And Heartache, its more concentrated dose of everything Leger does best is just as potent.

“I got the name for the album from an early ‘60s dime store collection of science fiction short stories a friend gave me,” he explains. “Everything around me seems like science fiction these days, and the phrase ‘Time Out For Tomorrow’ fit these songs and my mood in one way or another.”

In highlighting some of the album’s key moments, Leger points to the opening track “Canvas Of Gold,” on which he sings, “Everything was almost decided when we were young, you’ll stay poor like your family before and I’ll keep hustling.” It’s a reference to Toronto’s well-known gentrification projects in recent years that have put tremendous pressure on the city’s artistic communities. Jerry adds, “Close to where I live there’s a condo development starting at $400,000 called ‘The Poet.’ I don’t know too many poets who can afford that. I’m living in a time that is harder and harder to do what I at this point involuntarily do. What I have to do.”

He also takes aim at tensions stoked by hate groups on the inspiring “That Ain’t Here,” another seemingly endless battle in which artists have been forced to engage. However, the mood on Time Out For Tomorrow often abruptly shifts to showing off Leger’s genuine love of early rock ‘n roll, as evidenced by the gripping ballad “Read Between The Lines.”

“I originally wrote that one for The Del Fi’s, but many people I played it for convinced me to keep it for myself, so I did,” he says. “It has a great energy and feel, and I think this album more than any of the others really succeeded on getting the perfect feel for each tune. It’s hard to do; usually the songs come across better live, but I think with this record we managed to capture that spirit.”

In keeping with his love of all things vintage, Leger is a voracious vinyl collector and notes that when recording Time Out For Tomorrow, the two albums he was listening to most often were Lou Reed’s Coney Island Baby, and Nick Lowe’s The Impossible Bird. He says their influence had more to do with the overall sound he wanted to project rather than any specific musical or lyrical content.

“Coney Island Baby was the first solo Lou Reed record I heard, probably around age 14, and I’ve always loved it,” he says. “The production just glides along and really puts the focus on the words. My song ‘Justine’ on this record benefited from that the most.

“I got into Nick Lowe through Elvis Costello, and with The Impossible Bird, there’s a real brightness to that album—the sound just makes me feel good when I hear it. It’s the same feeling as when I throw on an old Everly Brothers record like ‘Cathy’s Clown.’ It gets me out of a depression every time, even though it has depressing lyrics! I wanted Time Out For Tomorrow to have that same kind of open arms sound to it while still presenting lyrics about the human condition for better or worse. I think my song ‘I Would’ is one Nick Lowe might dig.”

Indeed, other songwriters of Lowe’s caliber, such as Ron Sexsmith, and outlets such as Rolling Stone, PopMatters and the Toronto Star have sung Leger’s praises. He’s also shared stages with The Sadies, Justin Townes Earle, Deer Tick, Dawes, and others, along with making his debut at Holland’s Take Root Festival in 2018 alongside Neko Case, Kurt Vile, Father John Misty, Shakey Graves, and Alejandro Escovedo.

Canada may be known more these days for punching above its weight in the global pop music field, but its long and storied tradition of singer/songwriters refuses to die. Jerry Leger is carrying that torch, and if there’s any further proof needed that he’s at the vanguard, just listen to Time Out For Tomorrow.